ART AVENUE

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NEWSLETTER

ART AVENUE

ABOUT

INVENTORY

ARTISTS

NFTs

EVENTS

VIDEOS

CONTACT

LOCATIONS

ART-to-YOU

ART PAINTBAR

NEWSLETTER

Art is a discipline, if that’s how we want to define it, with the task of using beauty to influence the observer. The result we find ourselves contemplating is an image with a strong aesthetic impact that instils our ‘self’ with a feeling of harmony, raising our level of consciousness and our sensitivity. This is precisely what happens with the art of Gianpaolo Brunoni, an artist with a wide-ranging and abstract imagination, whose use of the technique of dripping in certain compositions shows the influence of Pollock on his work.

The numerous paintings combine to create a strand of work that oscillates between extreme introspection and extroversion of the self, where the artist strips himself bare in front of the observer. His art therefore provides a binary dialogue between subjectivity and objectivity, although the two are never separated; the clear border between the two fields is invaded, allowing the artist to reveal himself under the watchful eye of strangers. Subjectivity and objectivity mix together as though they were part of one original ‘whole’, and this union can be felt strongly throughout Brunoni’s works, visible in his use of colour and in the crafting of formless shapes that bring to mind the organic nature of the body and of flesh. One way of defining his technique is that he makes the abstract concrete, not creating precise images but instead depicting the purest substance of the abstraction, giving us the experience of transcending reality without being uprooted from the tangible nature of the world. Here too, a ‘battle’ of contrasts takes place: high and low, rising and falling wage war as both subject and objecgt. However, these exchanges are not destructive; on the contrary, they allow a new level of awareness and research to be created, something refined that can be grasped in people’s minds.

The focus of this research, carried out over many years, cannot be reduced to a single aim. There is no finish line in this artistic journey, but rather a constant succession of events and reflections that increasingly centre on substance and abstraction, pushing the artist’s work towards ever more mysterious and mystical fields and profound influences. Colour is therefore a way of avoiding reality, adding dynamism to the surface of the canvas, the bi-dimensionality of which is nothing more than the first frontier in a fleeting awareness that plummets into a completely unknown, dark abyss. Brunoni therefore acts as our guide in this maze of images waiting to be discovered. His paintings can be seen as maps of a new and original imagination, with the task of accompanying us on this abstract journey towards the wonders of the unknown.

This sums up the art of Brunoni, whose instinctive and profound strokes produce evocative visions through clear colours or veiled hues, modelling the space of the canvas to make room for our soul.

Giorgio Grasso, art historian and critic, Milan

“When I am engrossed in my pictures, I am not consciously aware of what I am doing. Not until I stop and contemplate do I realise what I have just created. I don’t worry about changing things or possibly ruining the picture etcetera, because it has an identity of its own which I am trying to unveil.”

GIANPAOLO BRUNONI

GIANPAOLO BRUNONI

Art is a discipline, if that’s how we want to define it, with the task of using beauty to influence the observer. The result we find ourselves contemplating is an image with a strong aesthetic impact that instils our ‘self’ with a feeling of harmony, raising our level of consciousness and our sensitivity. This is precisely what happens with the art of Gianpaolo Brunoni, an artist with a wide-ranging and abstract imagination, whose use of the technique of dripping in certain compositions shows the influence of Pollock on his work.

The numerous paintings combine to create a strand of work that oscillates between extreme introspection and extroversion of the self, where the artist strips himself bare in front of the observer. His art therefore provides a binary dialogue between subjectivity and objectivity, although the two are never separated; the clear border between the two fields is invaded, allowing the artist to reveal himself under the watchful eye of strangers. Subjectivity and objectivity mix together as though they were part of one original ‘whole’, and this union can be felt strongly throughout Brunoni’s works, visible in his use of colour and in the crafting of formless shapes that bring to mind the organic nature of the body and of flesh. One way of defining his technique is that he makes the abstract concrete, not creating precise images but instead depicting the purest substance of the abstraction, giving us the experience of transcending reality without being uprooted from the tangible nature of the world. Here too, a ‘battle’ of contrasts takes place: high and low, rising and falling wage war as both subject and objecgt. However, these exchanges are not destructive; on the contrary, they allow a new level of awareness and research to be created, something refined that can be grasped in people’s minds.

The focus of this research, carried out over many years, cannot be reduced to a single aim. There is no finish line in this artistic journey, but rather a constant succession of events and reflections that increasingly centre on substance and abstraction, pushing the artist’s work towards ever more mysterious and mystical fields and profound influences. Colour is therefore a way of avoiding reality, adding dynamism to the surface of the canvas, the bi-dimensionality of which is nothing more than the first frontier in a fleeting awareness that plummets into a completely unknown, dark abyss. Brunoni therefore acts as our guide in this maze of images waiting to be discovered. His paintings can be seen as maps of a new and original imagination, with the task of accompanying us on this abstract journey towards the wonders of the unknown.

This sums up the art of Brunoni, whose instinctive and profound strokes produce evocative visions through clear colours or veiled hues, modelling the space of the canvas to make room for our soul.

Giorgio Grasso, art historian and critic, Milan

“When I am engrossed in my pictures, I am not consciously aware of what I am doing. Not until I stop and contemplate do I realise what I have just created. I don’t worry about changing things or possibly ruining the picture etcetera, because it has an identity of its own which I am trying to unveil.”